The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

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The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-10-21, 13:21

LooseGoose, like most Trump voters who refuse to reflect on their continued support of the president, are intentionally blind to the fact that that Russia is waging a type of information war against the U.S.

This observation is independent of Mueller's ongoing investigation of Trump and the Trump campaign. In other words, the claim that Russia is waging a type of information war against the U.S. is not dependent on, or otherwise related to, Trump or the Trump campaign.

Where it connects to Trump is that the administration seems to be doing nothing about it. We have seen the recent news. It goes beyond hacking and simple misinformation, but more active measures designed to divide the U.S. and sow chaos (which we know is a ladder). For example, "Russia’s most infamous troll farm recruited US activists to help stage protests and organize self-defense classes in black communities as part of an effort to sow divisions in US society ahead of the 2016 election and well into 2017." Russia used Facebook ads and then target specific communities. Even the once popular pro-Trump Twitter account @TEN_GOP was shut down when it was discovered it was run by Russian intelligence. On more than one occasion, I saw Trump supporters on this site post information sourced from that Twitter account.

On Wednesday, Jeff Sessions testified before the Senate Judiciary committee. Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse did not ask about collusion between Trump and Russia, but did ask how the U.S. was responding to Russia's attempt to interfere in U.S. domestic politics.

With Midwestern gentility, the Nebraska senator told Sessions that he wasn’t going to grill him about Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Rather, he said, “I would like to continue talking about the Russians but in the context of the long-term objectives that Vladimir Putin has to undermine American institutions and the public trust.… We face a sophisticated long-term effort by a foreign adversary to undermine our foreign policy and our ability to lead in the world by trying to undermining confidence in American institutions.”

Russia will be back in the 2018 and 2020 election cycles, Sasse argued. “We live at a time where info ops and propaganda and misinformation are a far more cost-effective way for people to try to weaken the United States of America than by thinking they can outspend us at a military level.… So as the nation’s chief law enforcement officer and as a supervisor of multiple components of our intelligence community … do you think we’re doing enough to prepare for future interference by Russia and other foreign adversaries in the information space?”

You’d think this question would be a golden opportunity for Sessions. After all, if you’re a man who has had some — ahem — inconvenient interactions with former Ambassador Sergey Kislyak, you might relish the chance to answer a question about what you are doing to prevent Russian interference in the future, as a chance to go on offense and show how serious you are about tackling a problem that has undermined your reputation.

But Sessions’s answer did not inspire confidence: “Probably not. We’re not. And the matter is so complex that for most of us, we are not able to fully grasp the technical dangers that are out there.”

Sessions acknowledged “disruption and interference, it appears, by Russian officials” and noted that it “requires a real review.” But he said nothing about what the department is doing to ready itself.

Sasse followed up, giving him an explicit chance to spell it out. “So what steps has the department taken,” or should it take, “to learn the lessons of 2016 … in fighting foreign interference?” he asked.

Crickets from Sessions.

The department, he said, is specifically reviewing commercial, rather than political, interference from foreigners and the theft of trade secrets and data — an enforcement priority that in fact long predates the Trump administration. “We’ve got indictments that deal with some of those issues,” he said, perhaps not even realizing that he was not talking about the same subject Sasse was asking about. He noted that the department’s national security division has some “really talented people” — which is true but hardly constitutes a step he is taking to combat the Russia threat. And he touted the FBI’s experts, too. Then he acknowledged that, despite all this, the department’s capabilities are still not at the appropriate level yet.

As to a specific answer to Sasse’s question — that is, what has the department done or is planning to do to confront information operations threats from Russia in the future? Not a word.

Sasse returned to the point a few minutes later, and Sessions’s answer got even worse. Sasse asked: “Do you think the Department of Justice has a proactive role in looking at hardening our democratic process against foreign interference?”

Sessions responded that Sasse had made a “valuable point” and that if Sasse had any thoughts toward legislation, he was eager to hear them. But as to any proactive role on the Justice Department’s part, Sessions made only the following remarkable admission: “I am not sure we have a specific review underway at this point in time.”

You read that right. According to the attorney general, the Justice Department is not even reviewing the specific question of what policy or bureaucratic changes might be appropriate in establishing an active role for the department concerning the most basic defense of democracy.

http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/10/20/jeff-sessions-just-confessed-his-negligence-on-russia/

So the answer is nothing. The administration is lost on how to approach this issue despite telling voters during the campaign that cyber defense would be a main priority. This is significant. Nearly two year ago a Kremlin advisor said the following a Russian security conference:

"You think we are living in 2016. No, we are living in 1948. And do you know why? Because in 1949, the Soviet Union had its first atomic bomb test. And if until that moment, the Soviet Union was trying to reach agreement with  Truman to ban nuclear weapons, and the Americans were not taking us seriously, in 1949 everything changed and they started talking to us on an equal footing. I’m warning you: We are at the verge of having ‘something’ in the information arena, which will allow us to talk to the Americans as equals.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2017/01/18/russias-radical-new-strategy-for-information-warfare/?utm_term=.9420619fe5a5

Maybe they are no longer on the verge, and are showing us an amazing capability to wage a new kind of war. What is the U.S. doing to counter Russia? We cannot blame this all on Trump. Republicans and Democrats do not mind a little chaos if they can turn it into electoral victories, and the media does not mind a little chaos if they can turn it into profit. Basically those who should be defending against this actually have some incentive not to. So they are all failing to address this problem, but the greatest responsibility to do so falls with president's administration and they are currently asleep at the wheel.


Last edited by Turtleneck on 2017-11-12, 18:05; edited 2 times in total
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-10-21, 14:04

Bump

I am wondering if Trump supporters will discuss this and maybe point to efforts being taken to counter Russia. Anything to add, Loose?
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-10-21, 20:04

Bump. Loose, I know your concern for the well-being of the country is entirely fake, but why no comment? Is it because you might have to articulate an original thought?
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-10-25, 00:37

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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-10-25, 00:38

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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-01, 21:52

Bump.

Loose, now that you agree Russia has been deploying active measures to sow discord in the U.S. (something you rigorously denied 10 months ago), can you please explain to us why Trump administration appears to be doing nothing?
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by GRR Spartan on 2017-11-02, 11:12

When you get a steady diet of Fox News and Drudge you tend to forget the election is over and what the man elected President does is of no concern.
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-07, 19:39

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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-12, 18:05

This is big...and fascinating


WASHINGTON — Jake Williams awoke last April in an Orlando, Fla., hotel where he was leading a training session. Checking Twitter, Mr. Williams, a cybersecurity expert, was dismayed to discover that he had been thrust into the middle of one of the worst security debacles ever to befall American intelligence.

Mr. Williams had written on his company blog about the Shadow Brokers, a mysterious group that had somehow obtained many of the hacking tools the United States used to spy on other countries. Now the group had replied in an angry screed on Twitter. It identified him — correctly — as a former member of the National Security Agency’s hacking group, Tailored Access Operations, or T.A.O., a job he had not publicly disclosed. Then the Shadow Brokers astonished him by dropping technical details that made clear they knew about highly classified hacking operations that he had conducted.

America’s largest and most secretive intelligence agency had been deeply infiltrated.

“They had operational insight that even most of my fellow operators at T.A.O. did not have,” said Mr. Williams, now with Rendition Infosec, a cybersecurity firm he founded. “I felt like I’d been kicked in the gut. Whoever wrote this either was a well-placed insider or had stolen a lot of operational data.”

Fifteen months into a wide-ranging investigation by the agency’s counterintelligence arm, known as Q Group, and the F.B.I., officials still do not know whether the N.S.A. is the victim of a brilliantly executed hack, with Russia as the most likely perpetrator, an insider’s leak, or both. Three employees have been arrested since 2015 for taking classified files, but there is fear that one or more leakers may still be in place. And there is broad agreement that the damage from the Shadow Brokers already far exceeds the harm to American intelligence done by Edward J. Snowden, the former N.S.A. contractor who fled with four laptops of classified material in 2013.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/12/us/nsa-shadow-brokers.html?smid=tw-nytimesworld&smtyp=cur


Last edited by Turtleneck on 2017-11-12, 18:31; edited 1 time in total
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-12, 18:30

Russia is the prime suspect in a parallel hemorrhage of hacking tools and secret documents from the C.I.A.’s Center for Cyber Intelligence, posted week after week since March to the WikiLeaks website under the names Vault7 and Vault8. That breach, too, is unsolved. Together, the flood of digital secrets from agencies that invest huge resources in preventing such breaches is raising profound questions.

Have hackers and leakers made secrecy obsolete? Has Russian intelligence simply outplayed the United States, penetrating the most closely guarded corners of its government? Can a work force of thousands of young, tech-savvy spies ever be immune to leaks?

Lurking in the background of the Shadow Brokers investigation is American officials’ strong belief that it is a Russian operation. The pattern of dribbling out stolen documents over many months, they say, echoes the slow release of Democratic emails purloined by Russian hackers last year.

But there is a more specific back story to the United States-Russia cyber rivalry.

Starting in 2014, American cybersecurity researchers who had been tracking Russia’s state-sponsored hacking groups for years began to expose them in a series of research reports. American firms, including Symantec, CrowdStrike and FireEye, reported that Moscow was behind certain cyberattacks and identified government-sponsored Russian hacking groups.

In the meantime, Russia’s most prominent cybersecurity firm, Kaspersky Lab, had started work on a report that would turn the tables on the United States. Kaspersky hunted for the spying malware planted by N.S.A. hackers, guided in part by the keywords and code names in the files taken by Mr. Snowden and published by journalists, officials said.

Kaspersky was, in a sense, simply doing to the N.S.A. what the American companies had just done to Russian intelligence: Expose their operations. And American officials believe Russian intelligence was piggybacking on Kaspersky’s efforts to find and retrieve the N.S.A.’s secrets wherever they could be found. The T.A.O. hackers knew that when Kaspersky updated its popular antivirus software to find and block the N.S.A. malware, it could thwart spying operations around the world.

So T.A.O. personnel rushed to replace implants in many countries with new malware they did not believe the Russian company could detect.

In February 2015, Kaspersky published its report on the Equation Group — the company’s name for T.A.O. hackers — and updated its antivirus software to uproot the N.S.A. malware wherever it had not been replaced. The agency temporarily lost access to a considerable flow of intelligence. By some accounts, however, N.S.A. officials were relieved that the Kaspersky report did not include certain tools they feared the Russian company had found.

As it would turn out, any celebration was premature.
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-20, 18:32

LooseGoose wrote:

You guys keep swallowing all the shit these turds are feeding you.

Is this just turds, Loose. Let me know. Welcome your take on the situation. Thanks. Again, I know you often point out when people fail to answer your questions, so I just want to make sure you saw some of the questions I posed to you. Thanks again!
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Re: The Real Russian We Do Not Post About

Post by Turtleneck on 2017-11-20, 20:52

Examining Russian Disinformation
Thomas Rid of Johns Hopkins tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro about the history of Russian disinformation and how it's become more effective in the age of social media.

One example during the Olympic Games in Los Angeles in 1984 - there was an operation that the KGB pretended to be the Ku Klux Klan, the KKK. And they published a leaflet, and they sent it to African athletes at the Olympics, threatening them with horribly racist cartoons of Africans hanging from a tree, depicting a lynching. And, of course, that had an effect because there was an existing problem that was actually there, and they tapped into that emotion.

RID: One, it's something that they've done for a very long time. They have reactivated this old skill, and they still have the muscle memory to get it to work. Social media and the internet more broadly are basically paradise for disinformation. You look at WikiLeaks, and it's basically the dream come true of disinformation operatives. Suddenly, you have a technology that's purpose-built to obfuscate sources and to help dump large volumes of compromising information into the public.
https://www.npr.org/2017/11/19/565153437/examining-russian-disinformation
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